Course catalogue

István Pásztori-Kupán · Cred 1 · Sem 5 · Őszi

This course is intended to provide a how-to approach both to graduate and postgraduate theological research and writing in general. Good formal writing, in our view, need not be stiff, labored, or boring to read. It can be creative, direct,
and vigorous — even to the point of possessing some literary merit. Further it must pass the tests of simplicity, accuracy, economy, and clarity.

István Pásztori-Kupán · Cred 4 · Sem 5 · Őszi

An introduction to the literature and themes of the patristic period, from the first to the seventh centuries. Emphasis will be on reading and discussing primary sources in translation.

István Pásztori-Kupán · Cred 4 · Sem 6 · Tavaszi

An introduction to the literature and themes of the patristic period, from the first to the seventh centuries. Emphasis will be on reading and discussing primary sources in translation.

István Pásztori-Kupán · Cred 4 · Sem 7 · Tavaszi
BS41 · Dogmatics I

Dogmatics is the branch of theology which tries give an analytical reflection on Christian doctrine. The goal of this course is to present the teaching of the Church concerning these topics in their historical context in order to develop the ability to formulate the christian doctrine as relevant as possible for the present age.

István Pásztori-Kupán · Cred 4 · Sem 8 · Tavaszi
BS42 · Dogmatics II

Dogmatics is the branch of theology which tries give an analytical reflection on Christian doctrine. The goal of this course is to present the teaching of the Church concerning these topics in their historical context in order to develop the ability to formulate the christian doctrine as relevant as possible for the present age.
In the second semester we are going further with anthropology, chritology, soteriology, sacramentology, pneumatology and eschatology.

István Pásztori-Kupán · Cred 3 · Sem 3 · Őszi

Many of the doctrines central to Christianity have important philosophical implications or presuppositions. In the history of Christian theology, philosophy has sometimes been seen as a natural complement to theological reflection, whereas at other times practitioners of the two disciplines have regarded each other as mortal enemies.